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Classical Studies



Undergraduate Officer
S.L. Ager, ML 239, ext. 2943

CLAS100S

Classical Studies

Note: Students should consult with the departmental Undergraduate Advisor for the latest information on course offerings. Some courses are offered in rotation.

CLAS 100 F 3C 0.5
An Introduction to Classical Studies
An introduction to Greek and Roman civilization, focusing on six key aspects of the discipline of classical studies: history, literature, philosophy, myth and religion, art and architecture, and classical archaeology.
Not open to students with more than two CLAS courses.

CLAS 101 F 3C 0.5
Colossos - The Major Figures of Ancient Greece
An introductory study of the achievement of ancient Greece through some of its most prominent figures. Each year two of the following will be featured: Cleopatra and the Collapse of the Hellenistic World; Homer and Heroic Greece; Pericles and the Rise of Democracy; Socrates, Man and Martyr; Alexander the Great and The Age of Expansion.

CLAS 102 W,S 3C 0.5
Colossos - The Major Figures of Ancient Rome
An introductory study of the achievement of ancient Rome through some of its most prominent figures. Each year two of the following will be featured: Julius Caesar and the Collapse of the Republic; Augustus: The Empire Rises; Nero and the Corruption of Power; Hadrian and the Imperial Machine.

CLAS200S

CLAS 201 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Ancient Greek Society
A survey of the civilization of Classical Greece, featuring such topics as the individual (male and female), political institutions, art, religion, philosophy, literature, social life and leisure activities. Students are advised to preregister early for this course as enrolment is limited.

CLAS 202 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Ancient Roman Society
A survey of the civilization of the Roman Republic and Empire, featuring such topics as the individual (male and female), political institutions, art, religion, philosophy, literature, social life and leisure activities.
Students are advised to preregister early for this course as enrolment is limited.

CLAS 251 S 3C 0.5
Greek History
A survey of ancient Greece, emphasizing its political, military, social and economic aspects.
This course is acceptable for credit by the History Department.

CLAS 252 F 3C 0.5
Roman History
A military, political, social and economic survey of Rome from earliest times to the Empire's fall.
This course is acceptable for credit by the History Department.
Classical Studies accepts HIST 238 for Classical Studies credit, but a student may not take both HIST 238 and CLAS 252.

CLAS 255 3C 0.5
Early Medieval Society
A survey of early Medieval civilization featuring such topics as the individual (male and female), political institutions, art, architecture, religion, philosophy, literature, social life and leisure activities.

CLAS 265 W 2C 0.5
Ancient Epic in Translation
This course examines ancient epic through the Iliad and Odyssey of Homer, the Argonautica of Apollonius Rhodius and the Aeneid of Vergil. The evolution of the epic genre is traced in lectures and discussions. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is needed.

CLAS 266 3C 0.5
Ancient Tragedy in Translation
This course focuses upon the dramatic literature of the classical age in Athens. It features the Oresteia of Aeschylus, the ROedipusS plays of Sophocles, and the Medea, Hippolytus and Bacchae of Euripides. Roman tragedy is also studied for comparative purposes through the plays of Seneca. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is needed.
Cross-listed as DRAMA 251

CLAS 292 F 3C 0.5
Women in Classical Antiquity
A study of the evidence for the lives of women, as well as the relations between women and men, in antiquity.
Prereq: One of CLAS 100, 201, 202, or permission of instructor

CLAS300S

CLAS 301 F 3C 0.5
Ancient Myth and Religion 1
A study of Greek and Roman myth, including the birth of the gods, creation, the Olympians, Prometheus and the fall, the flood, the ages of man, and the Greek mystery religions. Not open to first-year students.

CLAS 302 W,S 3C 0.5
Ancient Myth and Religion 2
A study of Greek and Roman legend, including the cycles of Troy, Mycenae, Thebes; the Argonauts, the heroes, Odysseus; and the oriental mystery religions (with their relation to Christianity). Not open to first- year students.

CLAS 351 3C 0.5
Greek Art and Architecture
A survey of the art and architecture of the ancient Greek world from the Minoan to the Hellenistic periods. Not open to first-year students.
Cross-listed as FINE 310

CLAS 352 W 3C 0.5
Roman Art and Architecture
A survey of the art and architecture of the Roman world from Etruscan to Imperial Times. Not open to first-year students.
Cross-listed as FINE 311

CLAS 361 F 3C 0.5
History of Ancient Philosophy 1
From the beginnings to Plato.
Cross-listed as PHIL 380
Offered by the Philosophy Department

CLAS 362 W 3C 0.5
History of Ancient Philosophy 2
From Aristotle to the close of classical antiquity.
Cross-listed as PHIL 381
Offered by the Philosophy Department

CLAS 365 3C 0.5
Ancient Comedy in Translation
The comedy of the ancient Greeks and Romans will be examined through selected plays of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus and Terence. The different types of comedy, and their evolution, will be studied in lectures and discussions. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is needed.
Prereq: CLAS 266 or instructor's permission
Cross-listed as DRAMA 385 (formerly DRAMA 358)

CLAS 366 2S 0.5
Ancient Lyric and Satire in Translation
Lyric poetry of Greece and Rome, including Sappho, Pindar, Catullus, Horace and others; classical satire, including Horace, Petronius, Juvenal, Lucian. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is needed.
Prereq: CLAS 265 or 266 or an appropriate course in literature, or instructor's permission

CLAS 371 3C 0.5
Christianity and the Roman Empire
This course examines the relationship between Christianity and the Roman Empire, dealing in particular with the Christians in the social context of the Roman Empire generally and its various regions.
Prereq: CLAS 202, 252 or permission of instructor

CLAS 373 F 3C 0.5
The Fall of the Roman Empire
This course deals with the transition of the Roman Empire into the beginnings of the European states in the West and the Byzantine Empire in the East. Popular theories for the Rdecline and fallS of the old Roman Empire are examined.
Prereq: CLAS 202, 252 or instructor's permission

CLAS 384 W 3C 0.5
Science and Technology of Ancient Greece and Rome
A study of scientific thought and achievements in such areas as astronomy, biology, anatomy and medicine, and of the technological skills which produced and distributed raw materials, manufactured goods and agricultural products.
Prereq: First year science or engineering course, or CLAS 201 or 202 or 251 or 252 or instructor's permission

CLAS400S

CLAS 402 3C 0.5
The Aegean in the Bronze Age
A senior course concentrating on the Cycladic, Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations of the Bronze Age.
Prereq: CLAS 201, 251, 351 or instructor's permission

CLAS 485 F,S 2C 0.5
Greco-Roman Civilization and History 1
Senior seminar; intensive study of various problems.
Prereq: Previous work in ancient history or instructor's permission
This course is acceptable for credit by the History Department (but not as a senior seminar).

CLAS 486 2S 0.5
Greco-Roman Civilization and History 2
Senior seminar; intensive study of various problems.
Prereq: Previous work in ancient history or instructor's permission
This course is acceptable for credit by the History Department (but not as a senior seminar).

CLAS 490A/B F,W 0.5/0.5
Senior Honours Thesis
All senior honours students should consult with the Undergraduate Advisor about writing a thesis or doing Directed Study. For further details see Classical Studies programs.
A letter grade for CLAS 490A will be submitted only after the completion of CLAS 490B.

CLAS 492-498
Senior Seminars
By arrangement with the Department, an individual student or a small group of students will follow a course of study under the supervision of a faculty member.

GRK100S

Greek

Note:

  1. Students should consult with the departmental Undergraduate Advisor for the latest information on course offerings. Some courses are offered in rotation.
  2. Senior standing in Greek is normally defined as successful completion of GRK 201 and 202; exceptional students may also be admitted to 300- or 400-level courses with instructor's permission. For 400-level courses a 300-level course is strongly recommended as a preliminary.

GRK 100A F 4C 0.5
Introductory Ancient Greek 1
A course designed for students beginning the study of ancient Greek or who have not yet reached the level expected in GRK 201/202. The teaching approach emphasizes exposure to simple texts as soon as possible, but students desiring minimal competence in reading should go on to do GRK 100B.
Antireq: RS 106A

GRK 100B W 4C 0.5
Introductory Ancient Greek 2
Continuation of GRK 100A. Most of the rules of Greek grammar will be covered by the end of the year, and students should have a minimal competence in reading prose texts; but for the remaining grammar and further practice students should go on to do GRK 231.
Prereq: GRK 100A or RS 106A

GRK200S

GRK 201 F 3C 0.5
Intermediate Greek
The course will complete the study of Greek grammar and move on to unadapted readings in Greek authors.
Prereq: GRK 100B or equivalent
(Formerly GRK 231)

GRK 202 W 3C 0.5
Selections from Greek Authors
A course designed to follow GRK 201 including both literature and grammar review. Authors normally read are Plato and Homer.
Prereq: GRK 201
(Formerly GRK 232)

GRK300S

GRK 351 3C 0.5
Advanced Composition and Grammar
Intensive study of Greek language and style through composition and translation.
Prereq: Senior standing in Greek

GRK 363 F 3C 0.5
Introduction to Greek Tragedy
An examination of the dramatic art of Euripides and Sophocles by translations from the Greek and readings in English translation.
Prereq: Senior standing in Greek

GRK 370 3C 0.5
Greek Historians
One or more of Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon may be read.
Prereq: Senior standing in Greek

GRK 375 3C 0.5
Homer
Extended reading of Homer.
Prereq: Senior standing in Greek
(Formerly GRK 452)

GRK400S

GRK 472 3C 0.5
Advanced Reading in Greek Poetry
Selections from one or more authors may be read, e.g., Aeschylus, the Lyric poets.
Prereq: Senior standing in Greek

GRK 473 3C 0.5
Greek Comedy
Selected plays of Aristophanes and Menander.
Prereq: Senior standing in Greek
(Formerly GRK 462)

GRK 474 W 3C 0.5
Advanced Reading in Greek Prose
Demosthenes, Lysias and other authors may be read.
Prereq: Senior standing in Greek

GRK 475 3C 0.5
Reading in Greek Philosophy
One or more authors may be read, e.g., the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle.
Prereq: Senior standing in Greek

GRK 490-499
Senior Seminars
By arrangement with the Department, an individual student or a small group of students will follow a course of study under the supervision of a faculty member.
Prereq: Senior Standing in Greek

LAT100S

Latin

Note:

  1. Students should consult with the departmental Undergraduate Advisor for the latest information on course offerings. Some courses are offered in rotation.
  2. Senior standing in Latin is normally defined as successful completion of LAT 203 and 204; exceptional students may also be admitted to 300- or 400-level courses with instructor's permission. For 400-level courses a 300-level course is strongly recommended as a preliminary

LAT 100A F 4C 0.5
Introductory Latin 1
A course designed for students beginning the study of Latin or who have not yet reached the level expected in LAT 203/204. Although the teaching approach emphasizes exposure to simple texts as soon as possible, students desiring basic competence in reading should go on to do LAT 100B.
Students are advised to preregister early for this course as enrolment is limited.

LAT 100B W 4C 0.5
Introductory Latin 2
Continuation of LAT 100A. The aim is to attain basic reading competence in prose.
Prereq: LAT 100A

LAT200S

LAT 203 F 3C 0.5
A Survey of Latin Literature 1
A general survey of Latin prose and poetry from its origins to the beginning of the Roman Empire. The literary achievement of Rome will be examined mainly through selections in Latin with occasional readings in translation.
Prereq: OAC or Grade 13 Latin, T 100B or instructor's permission

LAT 204 W 3C 0.5
A Survey of Latin Literature 2
A general survey of Latin prose and poetry from the beginning to the fall of the Roman Empire; a continuation of LAT 203.
Prereq: LAT 203 or instructor's permission

LAT300S

LAT 351 3C 0.5
Latin Composition and Grammar
Composition, translation and grammar with intensive analysis of selected passages.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin

LAT 363 3C 0.5
Roman Comedy
The study in Latin of at least one play by Plautus or Terence, with supplementary readings in translation.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin

LAT 364 3C 0.5
Roman Oratory and Rhetoric
Selected orators and rhetoricians may be read, e.g., Cicero, Seneca, Quintilian, the Panegyricists.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin
(Formerly LAT 361)

LAT 365 3C 0.5
Roman Lyric Poetry
Selections from Catullus and Horace.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin

LAT 371 W 3C 0.5
Early Roman Historians
Readings from one or more of the early historians, e.g., Sallust, Livy.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin

LAT 375 3C 0.5
Vergil
Selections from the Aeneid, Georgics, Eclogues may be read.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin

LAT 381 F 3C 0.5
Medieval Latin
Survey of Medieval Latin poetry and prose.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin

LAT 391 3C 0.5
Advanced Latin Reading
A reading course designed to follow the second year of Latin. By the end of the course students should be competent to read moderately difficult prose and poetic texts. Authors and teaching techniques will be chosen to fit the needs of the students.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin
Recommended: LAT 351

LAT400S

LAT 421 3C 0.5
Latin Epigraphy
The course introduces and investigates Latin inscriptions as evidence for the Latin language and Roman political, religious, legal, social and economic history.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin

LAT 431 3C 0.5
Roman Philosophy
Readings from one or more of the principla Roman philosophical writers, e.g., Lucretius, Cicero, Seneca.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin

LAT 452 3C 0.5
Roman Letter-writing
Survey of Roman letter-writing through the Medieval period, e.g., Cicero, Pliny, Seneca, Symmachus, Heloise and Abelard.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin
(Formerly LAT 261)

LAT 463 3C 0.5
Later Roman Historians
Selections from one or more of the historians, e.g., Tacitus, Ammianus Marcellinus.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin
(Formerly LAT 372)

LAT 471 3C 0.5
Roman Elegy
Selections from Catullus, Ovid, Propertius and Tibullus.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin

LAT 481 3C 0.5
Roman Satire
Selections from the satirists, e.g., Horace, Petronius, Juvenal, Martial, Persius.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin

LAT 490-499
Senior Seminars By arrangement with the department, an individual student or a small group of students will follow a course of study under the supervision of a faculty member.
Prereq: Senior standing in Latin.

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