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Computer Science



Undergraduate Advisors
A. Pidduck, DC 3106, ext. 4662
B.W. Becker, DC 3105, ext. 4661

Note:

  1. The Department of Computer Science has two distinct streams of courses, one for students who have been admitted into a Computer Science Major program, and another designed for non-specialists who wish to become sophisticated computer users.
  2. CS courses numbered with middle digits 4 through 9 are considered CS Major courses. All other CS courses numbered with a middle digit of 0 through 3 are non-specialist courses. As such, they will not normally be open to Computer Science Major students, but they will be available to all other students in the University, subject to resource limitations. CS 130 and 134 are normally restricted to students in the Faculty of Mathematics.
  3. Several CS Major courses are also open to other students. In addition, where resources permit, students with exceptionally high academic standing in other programs may be considered for admission to restricted CS Major courses on an individual basis. To be considered, students should consult a Computer Science Undergraduate Advisor.
  4. Computer Science Major courses require students to have experience programming with a block-structured imperative language such as Pascal, C or Turing. These concepts of computer programming are covered in CS 130. Students who have substantial programming experience will be permitted to start their program with CS 134, which is an introduction to the basic concepts of computer science. Students in CS Major programs who do not take CS 130 will be required to take an additional third or fourth-year CS Major course.
  5. The Computer Science Department is experiencing demand for its courses beyond available resources. Thus, access to Computer Science courses cannot be guaranteed to all students. Every effort will be made to accommodate the students who preregister during published University preregistration periods, during which time, priority will be given to students who are at the appropriate year level. However, admission to specific courses cannot be guaranteed and course substitutions may be required to satisfy degree requirements.
  6. Regular students will not normally be permitted to enrol in Computer Science courses during the Spring term.
  7. Co-op students will not normally be permitted to enrol in Computer Science courses while on a work term.
  8. All other part-time students, as well as full-time non-degree and post-degree students, will normally be limited to at most one Computer Science course per term from the non-specialist offerings. (Post-degree students on academic leave from their home institution should consult a Computer Science Advisor.) Priority for registration will normally be given to students registered full-time in a degree program.
  9. Students in first and second year are limited to one Computer Science course per term. Students in CS Major programs are limited to three CS courses per term in third and fourth year. Other students are limited to two CS courses per term in third and fourth year.
  10. Please note that the terms in which courses are offered may deviate from those indicated below. Students are advised to consult the University Course Offerings List published at preregistration time.
  11. Where there is significant overlap between major and non-specialist courses, the major course can be used to satisfy the prerequisite for non-specialist courses, unless otherwise specified.
  12. Students who have demonstrated exceptionally strong academic performance will be permitted to enrol in 600-level CS courses at the discretion of the instructor, if there is available capacity. Courses at the 600 level may not be used to satisfy a program requirement for minimum number of courses in Computer Science at the 400 level.
  13. The prerequisite phrase "x-year standing" means that a student must be registered in year x or higher.
  14. The standard penalty for cheating will be the assignment of a grade of -100% for the assignment, test or exam in question, with a minimum deduction of 5% from the final course grade. All such incidents will also be reported to the Associate Dean (Undergraduate Studies) of the student's faculty.
  15. Since CS 462 and 476 are offered only in the Fall term, Co-op students in Stream 8 will need to carefully plan the sequence of prerequisites in order to take these courses in the 3B term.

CS100S

CS 100 F,W,S 2C,2L 0.5
Introduction to Computer Usage
An introduction to universally applicable computer services. Hands-on experience with common software and hardware, supported by examples of applications and social implications chosen from many disciplines. Topics include: electronic mail, word processing, spreadsheets, record management, and hardware and software concepts.
CS 100 cannot be counted for credit toward a BMath Honours degree.

CS 102 F,W,S 3C,2L 0.5
Introduction to Programming for Scientific Applications
Fundamental techniques of algorithm design and program development. Topics include: structured programming, simple data elements, sequential operations, iterative statements, selection statements, data aggregations, functions and subroutines. Emphasis is placed on mathematical and statistical computing.
Prereq: Computer literacy (e.g. CS 100 or extensive high school computing)
Antireq: CS 112, 130
CS 102 cannot be counted for credit toward a BMath Honours degree.

CS 112 W 2C,2T,2L 0.5
Introduction to Computer Programming
Fundamental techniques of algorithm design and program development. Topics include: structured programming, simple data elements, sequential operations, iterative statements, selection statements, data aggregations, functions and procedures, and an introduction to the development of databases. The examples demonstrate a variety of applications for computer programming.
Prereq: Computer literacy (e.g. CS 100 or extensive high school computing)
Antireq: CS 102, 130
CS 112 cannot be counted for credit toward a BMath Honours degree.

CS 130 F,W,S 2C,2T,2L 0.5
Concepts of Computer Programming
Fundamental concepts of computer programming, including data types, structured programming, algorithm design, and numerical methods. Sample programs and exercises will be drawn from various areas of mathematics. Labs will emphasize programming.
Prereq: Full-time degree registration in the Faculty of Mathematics
Antireq: CS 102, 112
CS 130 should be taken before CS 134 by students who have not had substantial programming experience.
Also offered at St. Jerome's College in the Fall term

CS 134 F,W,S 3C,1T,3L 0.5
Principles of Computer Science
An introduction to basic concepts of computer science, including the paradigms of theory, abstraction, and design. Broad themes include the design and analysis of algorithms, the management of information, and the programming mechanisms and methodologies required in implementations. Topics discussed include iterative and recursive sorting algorithms; lists, stacks, queues, trees, and their application; and the history and philosophy of computer science.
Prereq: Full-time degree registration in the Faculty of Mathematics, and CS 130 or an equivalent level of knowledge and experience.
Antireq: CS 212
Also offered at St. Jerome's College in the Winter term

CS200S

CS 212 F 3C 0.5
Programming Principles and Practice
High-level languages, including their specification and translation. Structured programming. Use of data structures, including lists and trees. Recursion. Sorting. Introduction to computational complexity and correctness.
Prereq: One of CS 102, 112, or equivalent
Antireq: CS 134
CS 212 cannot be counted for credit toward a BMath Honours degree.

CS 230 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Introduction to Computers and Computer Systems
Basic computer architecture, operating system services, and programming languages in support of development of software systems.
Prereq: One of CS 134, 212
Antireq: CS 241, 246, 342
CS 230 cannot be counted for credit in a Computer Science Major program.

CS 241 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Foundations of Sequential Programs
The relationship between high-level languages and the computer architecture that underlies their implementation, including basic machine architecture, assemblers, specification and translation of programming languages, linkers and loaders, block-structured languages, parameter passing mechanisms, and comparison of programming languages.
Prereq: CS 246
Antireq: CS 230

CS 246 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Software Abstraction and Specification
Systematic methods for designing, coding, testing, and documenting medium-sized programs. Major topics include formal specification, abstraction, modularity and reusability. Students will become strong apprentice programmers able to write a clear specification for a problem, read a specification and design the software to implement it, use appropriate data structures in a program, write reusable code and reuse existing code when possible, debug a program, and adequately test a program.
Prereq: CS 134
Antireq: CS 230

CS300S

CS 316 W 3C,1L 0.5
Introduction to Statistical Problem Solving by Computer
This is an applications oriented course which prepares the nonmathematical student to use the computer as a research tool. Topics include aids for statistical analysis and the preparation of documents such as reports and theses. The course provides sufficient background for application to other problems specific to the individual's field.
Prereq: One statistics course and computer literacy (e.g. CS 100 or high school computing), or consent of instructor
CS 316 cannot be counted for credit toward a BMath degree.

CS 330 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Management Information Systems
An introduction to information systems and their strategic role in business. Topics include types of information systems, organizational requirements, systems development strategies, decision support systems, data and information management, and information systems management, control and implementation.
Prereq: 2B standing and one of CS 134, 212
Antireq: CS 480, MSCI 441, (ACC 241, 442)
CS 330 cannot be counted for credit in a Computer Science Major program.

CS 334 W 3C 0.5
Data Types and Structures
Top-down design of data structures. Using representation- independent data types. Introduction to commonly used data types, including lists, sets, mappings, and trees. Selection of data representation.
Prereq: One of CS 230, 246 and third-year standing
Antireq: CS 340
CS 334 cannot be counted for credit in a Computer Science Major program.

CS 337 W 3C 0.5
Introduction to Numerical Analysis
Pitfalls in computation; solution of linear algebraic equations; polynomial interpolation; least squares; numerical integration and differentiation. The intent is to expose students to the theory behind modern algorithms for solving mathematical problems.
Prereq: CS 134, MATH 136, 138. One of CS 230, 246 is recommended.
MATH 235 and 237 are recommended
Antireq: CS 370, 372, 374
CS 337 cannot be counted for credit in a Computer Science Major program.

CS 338 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Computer Applications in Business: Databases
A user-oriented approach to the management of large collections of data. Methods used for the storage, selection and presentation of data. Common database management systems.
Prereq: One of CS 230, 246, 330
Antireq: CS 448
CS 338 cannot be counted for credit in a Computer Science Major program.

CS 340 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Data Structures and Algorithms
The use of abstract data types in the design of data structures; efficiency dictionaries; sorting and priority queues. Techniques for designing efficient algorithms; application to problems on graphs; design of heuristics and approximate solutions to apparently intractable problems.
Prereq: CS 241, C&O 230, and registration in a Computer Science Major program
Antireq: CS 334

CS 342 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Concurrent Programming
An introduction to understanding concurrency and writing concurrent programs, with an emphasis on language constructs used to express and control concurrency, and different concurrent programming techniques and styles. Major topics include: coroutines, mutual exclusion, semaphores, high-level concurrency, deadlock, interprocess communication and process structuring. Students will learn how to structure, implement and debug basic concurrent programs.
Prereq: CS 241 and registration in a Computer Science Major program
Antireq: CS 230, 242

CS 351 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Digital Design and Architecture
Boolean algebra. Design and analysis of both combinational and sequential circuits. Registers, counters, memory, programmable logic. CPU control logic, the arithmetic-logic unit. Input/output and interrupts.
Prereq: CS 241 and registration in a Computer Science Major program
Antireq: E&CE 223

CS 354 F,W 3C 0.5
Operating Systems
An introduction to the basic components of a modern operating system. Major topics include: concurrency in the large, memory management, device management, file systems, security, networks and distributed systems. Students will learn how to write complex programs that accomplish part of their operation through interaction with the operating system.
Prereq: CS 342 and registration in a Computer Science Major program

CS 360 F,W 3C 0.5
Introduction to the Theory of Computing
Models of computers including finite automata and Turing machines. Basics of formal languages with applications to syntax of programming languages. Unsolvable problems and their relevance to the semantics of programming. Concepts of computational complexity including NP completeness.
Prereq: CS 241, C&O 230

CS 370 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Numerical Computation
Principles and practices of basic numerical computation as a key aspect of scientific computation. Visualization of results. Approximation by splines, fast Fourier transforms, solution of linear and nonlinear equations, differential equations, floating point number systems, error, stability. Presented in the context of specific applications to image processing, analysis of data, scientific modeling.
Prereq: MATH 235, 237 and one of CS 230, 246
Antireq: CS 337, 372, 374
Replaces CS 372, 374 effective Fall 1995

CS 372 F,W 3C 0.5
Introduction to Scientific Computation: Numerical Linear Algebra
Pitfalls in computation. Direct solution of linear algebraic systems. Iterative solution of linear algebraic systems. Least-squares computations. Iterative solution of f(x) = 0. Minimization of functions of several variables.
Prereq: CS 134, MATH 235, 237
Antireq: CS 337, 370
Last offering: Winter 1995

CS 374 W,S 3C 0.5
Introduction to Scientific Computation: Numerical Approximation
Pitfalls in computation. Polynomial interpolation. Orthogonal polynomials and least-squares approximations. Numerical integration and differentiation. Data fitting.
Prereq: CS 134, MATH 235, 237
Antireq: CS 337, 370
Last offering: Winter 1995

CS400S

CS 430 F 3C 0.5
Applications Software Engineering
An investigation into the role and function of software engineering practice in the construction of computer based systems. Topics include: requirements and specification; documentation techniques; analysis and design; implementation; testing and maintenance; management issues.
Prereq: CS 330 or permission of instructor and third-year standing
Antireq: CS 446
CS 430 cannot be counted for credit in a Computer Science Major program.

CS 432 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Business Systems Analysis
Survey of organization and management theory. Systems theory and the systems approach. Systems design. Database concepts. Implementation and evaluation of computer based information systems.
Prereq: CS 330 and third-year standing
Antireq: CS 482
CS 432 cannot be counted for credit in a Computer Science Major program.

CS 436 W 3C 0.5
Distributed Computer Systems
An introduction to networks and computer systems, reliable communication, layered models, distributed file systems, cryptography, concurrency issues.
Prereq: One of CS 230, 246 and one of CS 330, 334, 338
Antireq: CS 336, 454
CS 436 cannot be counted for credit in a Computer Science Major program.

CS 442 F,S 3C 0.5
Principles of Programming Languages
An exposure to important concepts and issues in contemporary programming languages. Data types, abstraction, and polymorphism. Program structure. Lambda calculus and functional programming, logic programming, object-oriented programming. Semantics of programming languages. Critical comparison of language features and programming methodologies using examples drawn from a variety of programming languages including Lisp, Prolog, ML, Ada, Smalltalk, Icon, APL, and Lucid. Programming assignments involve the use of some of these languages.
Prereq: CS 340 and registration in a Computer Science Major program

CS 444 W 3C 0.5
Compiler Construction
Phases of compilation. Lexical analysis and a review of parsing. Compiler-compilers and translator writing systems. LEX and YACC. Scope rules, block structure, and symbol tables. Runtime stack management. Parameter passage mechanisms. Stack storage organization and templates. Heap storage management. Intermediate code. Code generation. Macros.
Prereq: CS 340, 360 and registration in a Computer Science Major program

CS 446 F,S 3C 0.5
Software System Design and Implementation
An investigation into the role and function of software engineering practice in the design and implementation of computer based systems. Topics include: structural design; procedural design; testing and reliability; management topics; programming languages and coding; portability techniques; maintenance; performance measurement and analysis.
Prereq: CS 342, and registration in a Computer Science Major program.
Antireq: CS 430

CS 448 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Introduction to Database Management
The course introduces the student to the techniques that have been developed for processing very large collections of data. The requirement that data be held on secondary storage (disks and tapes) has an enormous impact on the design of algorithms to access that data.
Prereq: CS 340, 354 and registration in a Computer Science Major program
Antireq: CS 338

CS 450 W 3C 0.5
Computer Architecture
The course is intended to provide the student with an appreciation of modern computer design and its relation to system architecture, compiler technology and operating system functionality. The course places an emphasis on design based on the measurement of performance and its dependency on parallelism, efficiency, latency and resource utilization.
Prereq: CS 351 or (CS 342 and E&CE 223), and registration in a Computer Science Major program

CS 452 F,S 3C 0.5
Real-time Programming
Intended to give students experience with tools and techniques of real-time programming, this course includes not only issues of microcomputer architecture and a real-time programming language and operating system, but also hands-on experience programming a microcomputer for applications such as process control, data acquisition and communication.
Prereq: CS 354 and registration in a Computer Science Major program. CS 351 is recommended.

CS 454 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Distributed Systems
An introduction to distributed systems, emphasizing the multiple levels of software in such systems. Specific topics include fundamentals of data communications, network architecture and protocols, local-area networks, concurrency control in distributed systems, recovery in distributed systems, and clock synchronization.
Prereq: CS 354 and registration in a Computer Science Major program. CS 351 is recommended.
Antireq: CS 436

CS 457 W 3C 0.5
System Performance Evaluation
Basic techniques of system performance evaluation. Specific topics include: performance modeling, discrete event simulation, verification and validation of simulation models, analysis of simulation output, analysis of single server queue and queueing networks, modeling of computer systems, networks, and other queueing or non-queueing systems.
Prereq: CS 230 or 246. For non-CS majors, CS 334 is strongly recommended.
Antireq: CS 437

CS 458 W 3C 0.5
Design of Microprocessor-Based Systems
An introduction to the design of digital systems such as those used in microcomputers, control and industrial applications, or those dedicated to specific tasks. Topics include: digital electronics, microprocessors, memory chips and systems, standard and specialized peripheral chips, development and integration systems, and case studies. Laboratory- oriented: small teams design and implement microprocessor-based systems.
Prereq: CS 351 and registration in a Computer Science Major program

CS 462 F 3C 0.5
Formal Languages and Parsing
Languages and their representations. Grammars - Chomsky hierarchy. Regular sets and sequential machines. Context-free grammars - normal forms, basic properties. Pushdown automata and transducers. Operations on languages. Undecidable problems in language theory. Applications to the design of programming languages and compiler construction.
Prereq: CS 360

CS 464 W 3C 0.5
Computational Complexity Theory
The classification of problems according to the computational resources required for their solution, with emphasis on properties of feasible computations rather than on specific algorithms. Topics include: time and space complexity, tractable and intractable problems, computation using randomness, parallel computation.
Prereq: CS 360

CS 466 F,S 3C 0.5
Algorithm Design and Analysis
Design of good algorithms and analysis of the resources they consume. Lower bounds on the resource requirements of algorithms to compute certain functions. Problems from the following areas are discussed in this light: sorting and order statistics, data structures, arithmetic computations, the NP-complete problems.
Prereq: CS 340, 360

CS 472 W 3C 0.5
Numerical Linear Algebra
Direct methods for the numerical solution of linear systems of equations and linear least squares problems. Numerical methods for solving the algebraic eigenvalue problem.
Prereq: CS 370 or (372, or CS 337 and consent of instructor. CS 374 is recommended.)

CS 476 F 3C 0.5
Numerical Solution of Differential and Integral Equations
Initial value problems: existence and uniqueness of solutions, one step methods, multistep methods, stability, error analysis. Boundary value problems: shooting and discretization methods, implementation problems especially for non-linear equations. Integral equations: correspondence to ordinary differential equations, initial value and boundary value problems, solution techniques.
Prereq: CS 370 or (374, or 337 and consent of instructor, or CS 372 and consent of instructor)
Cross-listed as AM 441

CS 480 W 3C 0.5
Information Systems Management
The integration of business and technical considerations in the design, implementation and management of information systems. Topics include: IS planning and development; business, management, executive, and strategic information systems, including case studies of selected large- scale systems; decision support systems; end-user training and development; systems security, disaster planning and recovery. Practical examples of information systems in industry.
Prereq: CS 340 and registration in a CS major program
Antireq: CS 330, MSCI 441, (C 241/442)

CS 482 F,W 3C 0.5
Techniques in Systems Analysis
This course emphasizes the role of systems analysis in the production of quality software systems to meet organizational needs. Topics include systems development life cycle; skills required by systems analysts, such as communication, fact-finding and project management; data modelling and management; logical and physical data flow diagrams; feasibility and cost-benefit analysis; process modelling (decision tables, trees and structured English); and CASE tools for analysis. When possible, the course will provide experience with a group systems analysis project, report and presentation.
Prereq: CS 340 and registration in a Computer Science Major program
Coreq: CS 448
Antireq: CS 432

CS 486 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Goals and methods of artificial intelligence. Methods of general problem solving. Introduction to mathematical logic. Mechanical theorem proving. Game playing. Natural language processing.
Prereq: CS 340 and registration in a Computer Science Major program

CS 487 W 3C 0.5
Introduction to Symbolic Computation
An introduction to the use of computers for symbolic mathematical computation, involving traditional mathematical computations such as solving linear equations (exactly), analytic differentiation and integration of functions, and analytic solution of differential equations.
Prereq: CS 241, PMATH 334 or consent of instructor

CS 488 F,W,S 3C 0.5
Introduction to Computer Graphics
Software and hardware for interactive computer graphics. Implementation of device drivers, 3-D transformations, clipping, perspective, and input routines. Data structures, hidden surface removal, colour shading techniques, and some additional topics will be covered.
Prereq: CS 340, 342, MATH 235, and registration in a Computer Science Major program

CS 492 W 2C,1D 0.5
The Social Implications of Computers
This course is designed to consider the problems caused for organizations and society by the advent of computer technology so that constructive solutions to these problems may be discussed.
Prereq: CS 340 and registration in a Computer Science Major program

CS 494 F,W 3C 0.5
Computers and the Law of Information Technology
An introduction to the subject of computer law, examining current legal issues and problems relating to the use of computer-based information systems, the protection of computer software and data bases, and the acquisition and sale of computer systems.
Prereq: Third-year standing in a Computer Science Major program

CS 498 0.5
Advanced Topics in Computer Science
See the Course Offerings List for topics available.
Prereq: Third-year standing in a Computer Science Major program

CS 499 0.5
Readings in Computer Science
This course cannot be used to satisfy any 400-level course requirement in a Computer Science Major program.

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