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Complementary Studies Requirements for Engineering Students


The professional engineer requires in addition to technical knowledge and skill, an understanding of society, its needs, and the engineer's role in society. An ability to make intelligent judgements that encompass human and social values, as well as technical values, is inherent in that role. Such areas form an essential complement to technical studies in the education of an engineer. The Complementary Studies component of the curricula in the Faculty of Engineering requires that all students in the Faculty receive instruction in the humanities and social sciences, engineering economics, communication, and the impact of technology on society.

The aim of complementary studies is to provide an understanding of our heritage and social environment, and of the way in which science and engineering interact with them. These studies should develop sufficient interest to encourage further individual study.

Further objectives are that the engineering student develop a broader intellectual outlook, a broader understanding of moral, ethical and social values, and an improved ability to communicate.

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Requirements

The Complementary Studies component of the student's program must satisfy the following:

  1. At least one course must be taken that deals with the Impact of Technology on Society. Courses which satisfy this requirement appear in List A - Impact Courses.
  2. At least one course must be taken in Engineering Economics. Courses which satisfy this requirement appear in List B - Engineering Economics Courses. (Note that core programs contain a course from this list.)
  3. At least two courses must be taken that deal with the central issues, methodologies and thought processes of the Humanities and Social Sciences. Courses that satisfy this requirement appear in List C - Humanities and Social Sciences Courses.
  4. A minimum number of courses must be taken as required by individual programs. The exact requirements vary according to program; for details, see individual departmental regulations. Courses which appear in Lists A, B, C and D may be used to meet these requirements.
  5. Provision must be made to develop the student's ability to communicate adequately both orally and in writing. The exact manner in which this requirement is satisfied varies according to program; for details, see individual departmental regulations.

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Complementary Studies Course Lists

List A - Impact Courses

ANTH 101 (F,W,S) Human and Cultural Evolution
ANTH 102 (F,W) Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology
CIV E 491 (W) Engineering Law
CLAS 384 (W) Science and Technology of Ancient Greece and Rome
ERS 231 (W) Environmental Issues in a Global Perspective
ERS 241K (F,W) Introduction to Environmental and Social Impact Assessment
ERS 337 (F) Biophysical Impact Assessment
GEN E 411 (F,S) Engineering Law
GEN E 412 (W) Ethics and the Engineering Profession (cross-listed as PHIL 315)
GEOG 368 (F) Conservation/Resource Management of the Built Environment
M E 401 (F,S) Law for the Professional Engineering
PHIL 207 (F) Science, Technology and Society
SCI 219 (F) Chemistry in Modern Society
SCI 263 (F) Science and Society
SCI 270 (W) Nuclear Science
SOC 232JTechnology and Social Change
STV 100 (F,W,S) Society, Technology and Values: Introduction
STV 202 (F,W) Design and Society
STV 204 (F,W) Society, Technology and Risk
STV 402 (W) Technology and Canadian Society

Other courses may be acceptable for this requirement. Prior approval is required from your department Associate Chair.

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List B - Engineering Economics

CH E 044 (F,S) Economics for Chemical Engineering
CIV E 292 (F,W) Engineering Economics
M SCI 261 (W,S) Managerial and Engineering Economics 1
SY DE 331 (S) Engineering Economics

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List C - Humanities and Social Sciences Courses

1. Pre-scheduled Humanities and Social Sciences Courses
Attempts have been made to schedule the following Humanities and Social Sciences courses in order to minimize conflicts. They will normally be given at 11:30 MWF, 7-10 M, or 7-10 T. (F) indicates Fall, (W) indicates Winter, (S) indicates Spring.

Social Sciences-based Courses
Economics: ECON 102 (F,W,S); ECON 202 (F,W,S)
Management Sciences: M SCI 211(F,W,S); M SCI 311 (F,W)
Political Science: PSCI 102M (W,S); PSCI 260A (F,S); PSCI 260B (W,S)
Psychology: PSYCH 101 (F,W,S); plus one term course to be announced (F,W)
Sociology: SOC 101 (F,W)

Humanities-based Courses
English: ENGL 105A (F,W,S)
French: FR 195A (F); FR 196A (W)
History: HIST 130 (W,S); HIST 253 (F); HIST 254 (W,S)
Philosophy: PHIL 200A (F,S); PHIL 200B (W); PHIL 300 (W); PHIL 315 (W) (GEN E 412)

2. Non Pre-scheduled Humanities and Social Sciences Courses
The following Humanities and Social Sciences courses are permissible but will not be pre-scheduled. In general, all literature and civilization courses in language departments are approved as Humanities and Social Sciences courses.
Anthropology (ANTH): All
Canadian Studies (CDN ST): All
Classical Studies (CLAS): All
Drama (DRAMA): 101A, 101B, 251
East Asian Studies (EASIA): 201R
Economics (ECON): All except 211, 221, 311, 321, 404, 411, 421, 422, 471
English (ENGL): All except 109, 129R, 140R, 141R, 151, 209, 210C, 240R and any approved for the English Language Proficiency requirement.
Environment & Resource Studies (ERS): 231, 338, 352, 385
Environmental St. (ENV S): 195
Fine Arts (FINE): * see home dept. Assoc. Chair
General Engineering (GEN E): 412
Geography (GEOG): 101, 120, 202A, 206, 221, 225, 227, 368
Gerontology (GERON): 100, 208, 344
Health Studies (HLTH): 220, 348, 349
History (HIST): All except 400-level courses
Kinesiology (KIN): 103, 348, 349, 352, 354
Management Sciences (M SCI): 211, 311
Middle East Studies (MES): All
Music (MUSIC): 140, 245, 253, 256, 334, 355, 363
Peace and Conflict Studies (PACS): All
Personality and Religion (SIPAR): All
Personnel Studies (PS): All (cannot be taken if M SCI 211 or 311 taken)
Philosophy (PHIL): All except 140, 145, 200 , 216, 241, 243, 245, 256, 359, 440A/B, 441/442, 443, 456
Planning (PLAN): 156, 225
Political Science (PSCI): All except 214, 291, 315
Psychology (PSYCH): All except 200, 256, 261, 271, 291, 292, 305, 307, 312, 317, 361, 391-399R, 400-level courses need approval of Psych. Dept.
Recreation (REC): 201, 204, 205, 230, 250, 300, 304, 425
Religious Studies (RS): All except 105A/B, 106A/B, 201, 305A/B, 306A/B
Science (SCI): 263
Sexuality, Marriage and the Family (SMF): All
Social Development Studies Interdisciplinary Social Science (ISS): All except 150R, 250R, 251R, 350D/E, 398R, 399R
Social Work (SOCWK): All except 001R, 350D/E, 390A/B, 398R, 399R
Society,Technology and Values (STV): All
Sociology (SOC): All except 280, 321, 322, 382, 410, 421, 498A-X, 499A/B
Women's Studies (WS): All except 365A-D, 475A-D (may be acceptable at the discretion of the Associate Chair when a course outline is shown)

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List D - Other Permissible Complementary Studies Courses

While the following courses may not be used to satisfy Requirements A, B, or C, they may be used to satisfy Requirement D. For details, see your Departmental regulations.
Accounting (ACC): 131, 132 but not with M SCI option, 371
Dance (DANCE): *see home department Associate Chair but not 242, 342
Environmental Studies (ENV S): 201, 401, 500
Fine Arts (FINE): * see home department Associate Chair
General Engineering (GEN E): 315, 415, 452
Kinesiology (KIN): 255
Management Sciences (M SCI): 461
Music (MUSIC): (100 or 150/151), 142, 231, 240, 254, 255, 260, 356, 361
Philosophy (PHIL): 145, 200 , 216, 241, 243, 245, 256, 359, 456
Political Science (PSCI): 291
Psychology (PSYCH): 256, 271, 305, 307, 312, 317
Recreation (REC): 100
Religious Studies (RS): 105A/B, 106A/B, 201, 305A/B, 306A/B

Notes

  1. Some courses are available by UW distance education and may be taken during a student's work terms. Also, courses taken at another university during a work term may be eligible for a "transfer of credit" if approved by the student's Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies.
  2. Students who decide their preferred choices at pre-registration time are most likely to get their choice. Changes made at the beginning of a term may cause timetable conflicts and thus may not be possible.
  3. For descriptions of the content of courses, see Chapter 16 of the UW Undergraduate Calendar under the program prefix of the course, e.g. CIV E - Civil Engineering, PHIL - Philosophy, etc.
  4. Students who wish to take linguistic and grammar courses must have their choices approved by their home department Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies and, if approved, students must also be assessed by the language department to determine their facility with the language. Such courses may only be used to satisfy requirement D above.
  5. Courses approved for the English Language Proficiency requirements are not acceptable for the Complementary Studies program.
  6. Students are responsible for ensuring they have the necessary prerequisites.
  7. Associate Chairs for Undergraduate Studies may change the course category for the program of individual students who are special cases.

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Options and Electives for Engineering Students

  1. Each of the Engineering undergraduate programs consists of two course groupings: In the elective courses, students with special interests may, with the approval of their department Associate Chair, structure individual groupings. However, for reasons of academic continuity and scheduling, particular course groupings have been identified and are recommended to students. Some of these course groupings are pre-scheduled to ensure that courses in the group will not conflict with core courses.
  2. The remaining elective courses are usually chosen from engineering department courses which will give some depth in a particular technical discipline appropriate to a student's branch of engineering. (See Engineering Departments' program descriptions for listings of suggested elective course groupings of this type.)
  3. Designated Options. Certain elective course groupings have been recognized by the Faculty of Engineering or the University as DESIGNATED OPTIONS. Students who complete the requirements of these options will have a designation of completion of the option recorded on their transcripts. At present the available options and the corresponding option co-ordinators are the following:
    Option                      Co-ordinator
    Mathematics                 G. Heppler, Systems Design
    Physics                     W. Huang, Elec. and Computer Engineering
    Computer Engineering        B.R. Preiss, Elec. and Computer Engineering
    Statistics                  C. Young, Stat. and Actuarial Science or 
                                K. Hipel, Systems Design Engineering
    Water Resources             N. Kouwen, Civil Engineering
    Management Sciences         F. Safayeni, Management Sciences
    Society, Technology         G.E. Schneider, Director of General Studies 
      and Values                  (Acting)
    International Studies       
      in Engineering            H.C. Ratz, Director of Exchange Programs
    Environmental Engineering   G.E. Schneider, Associate Dean of Engineering
    

    Because designated Options can require up to eight courses, it may be necessary for students to take extra courses to complete the required work in some options. To carry extra courses, a student's academic standing must be such that the extra load will not lead to a high risk of failure, and permission of the Department Associate Chair must be obtained.

    For a designation to appear on the transcript a student must achieve an average of 60% in the option courses and a grade of 50% in each of the courses in the option. Details follow later in this section.

  4. Although Engineering does not offer "MINORS" in its departments many other departments of the University do. A Minor requires a minimum of ten courses chosen from lists prepared by the departments. Engineering students who choose a Minor must take extra courses. However, often courses in a Minor can also be used to satisfy some of the requirements of the technical elective or complementary studies course groups.
  5. It is possible for a graduate with a BASc degree in Engineering to complete the requirements for a non-major General BA in a further two terms of study. Assuming satisfactory grades and the appropriate choice of Complementary Studies Electives, credit for liberal Arts and Science courses (including mathematics and science subjects in Engineering) may be transferred to meet up to two-thirds of the General BA requirement. Students interested in pursuing such a program should consult with their Department Associate Chair or the Director of General Studies for Engineering, and the Associate Dean of the Faculty of Arts for Undergraduate Affairs.
  6. The Faculty of Engineering, University of Waterloo, has student exchange programs with Engineering schools in other countries. These permit Waterloo students to experience study in different cultural environments, and to receive academic credit towards their program requirements. Such exchanges are currently active with:
    Australia          Monash University
                       Queensland University of Technology
                       University of Queensland
                       University of Technology, Sydney
    England            University of Hull
                       University of Leeds
    France             Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble
                       Institut National des Sciences Appliquees de Lyon
                       Université de Technologie de Compi#&232;gne
                       Universit#&233; de Nantes
                       Ontario/Rhône-Alpes [Grenoble; Lyon]
    Germany            Technische Universität Braunschweig
                       Technische Universität Hamburg-Harburg
                       Universität Karlsruhe
                       Universität Gesamthochschule Paderborn
                       Ontario/Baden-Württemberg [Stuttgart; Karlsruhe]
    Japan              Tottori University
    Poland             Warsaw University of Technology
    Northern Ireland   University of Ulster
    South Korea        Pohang Institute of Science and Technology
    Switzerland        École Polytechnique Fédérale de 
                         Lausanne
    Ukraine            Dnipropetrovsk Institutions
    

Notes

  1. Options and Electives available to engineering students are subject to change and development. Students are advised to obtain the latest information from their department Undergraduate Office or the Faculty of Engineering Associate Dean's Office before making final decisions.
  2. Students who decide their preferred choices at pre-registration time are most likely to get their choice. Changes made at the beginning of a term may cause timetable conflicts and thus may not be possible.
  3. For descriptions of the content of courses see Chapter 16 of this calendar under the program prefix of the course e.g. CIV E - Civil Engineering, PHIL - Philosophy, GEN E - General Engineering, etc.

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Details of Designated Options

Option in Mathematics

The aim of the Mathematics Option is to provide the student with a broad background in either pure or applied mathematics with an opportunity to take some courses in an area of specialization.

There are six required courses:
MATH 211 Advanced Calculus 1 (or equivalent)
MATH 212 Advanced Calculus 2 (or equivalent)
E & CE 316 Probability and Statistics (or equivalent)
MATH 235 Linear Algebra 2
either
PMATH 334 Introduction to Rings and Fields
or PMATH 336 Introduction to Group Theory
either
AM/PMATH 331 Real Analysis
or AM/PMATH 332 Complex Analysis

A student must additionally take two courses from the following, subject to availability and timetable constraints.
AM 331/PMATH 331 Real Analysis
AM 332/PMATH 332 Complex Analysis
AM 333/PMATH 365 Differential Geometry and Tensor Analysis
AM 351 Ordinary Differential Equations
AM 353 Partial Differential Equations 1
AM 361 Continuum Mechanics
AM 371C Classical Mechanics
AM 381C/PMATH 380A Introduction to Information Theory
AM 481C/PMATH 380B Applications of Information Theory

PMATH 334 Introduction to Rings and Fields
PMATH 336 Introduction to Group Theory
PMATH 340 Elementary Number Theory
PMATH 360 Geometry
PMATH 367 Set Theory and General Topology
PMATH 430A Introduction to Mathematical Logic 1
PMATH 430B Introduction to Mathematical Logic 2

C&O 230 Introduction to Combinatorics
C&O 342 Graph Theory 1
C&O 350 Linear Programming
C&O 367 Nonlinear Programming

The list of courses will be subject to change from time to time. For further information contact the Option Co-ordinator.

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Option in Physics

The Physics Option is intended for students who want to have a better background in the fundamentals of physical science than is available in the regular program.

There are five required courses:
PHYS 115 Mechanics
PHYS 125 Physics for Engineers
PHYS 234 Quantum Physics 1
PHYS 334 Quantum Physics 2
M E 250 Thermodynamics
or
PHYS 358 Thermodynamics

A student must additionally take three electives from Group A or three electives from group B, subject to availability and timetable constraints.

Group A
PHYS 259 Crystallography and X-Ray Diffraction
PHYS 359 Statistical Mechanics
PHYS 364 Mathematical Physics 1
PHYS 365 Mathematical Physics 2
PHYS 434 Quantum Physics 3
PHYS 435 Solid State Physics
PHYS 443 Continuum Mechanics
PHYS 444 Modern Particle Physics
PHYS 454 Quantum Physics 4

Group B
PHYS 364 Mathematical Physics 1
PHYS 365 Mathematical Physics 2
PHYS 375 Astrophysics 2
AM 475 Introduction to General Relativity
PHYS 445 Modern Optics
PHYS 476A-Z Special Topics in Astrophysics

The list of courses in Groups A and B will be subject to change from time to time. For further information, contact the Option Co-ordinator.

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Option in Computer Engineering

This is a Designated Faculty Option which is available to students in Electrical Engineering and Systems Design Engineering to give greater training in software and to augment digital hardware capabilities. For details of this option students are referred to the Electrical and Computer Engineering and Systems Design Engineering sections of this calendar.

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Option in Statistics

The aim of the Statistics Option is to provide the student with a broad background in applied statistics, especially in the areas of multiple regression, quality control, experimental design and applied probability.
There are four required courses:
STAT 231 Statistics (or equivalent, e.g. SY DE 214, M E 202, CH E 022, CIV E 224)
STAT 331 Applied Linear Models (or equivalent, e.g. SY DE 334)
STAT 333 Applied Probability or STAT 430 Experimental Design
STAT 335 Statistical Process Control

Because of the overlap of STAT 335 with STAT 430 and SY DE 214 or ME 202, students who have taken these courses should check with the program advisors for useful alternatives.

A student must take three additional courses from those listed below:
STAT 230 Probability (or equivalent, e.g. SY DE 213)
STAT 332 Sampling
STAT 333 Applied Probability
STAT 371 Stochastic OR Models (SY DE 511 or M SCI 431 may be substituted)
STAT 430 Experimental Design
STAT 431 Applications of Linear Models
STAT 433 Stochastic Processes
STAT 443 Forecasting
CH E 037 Applied Mathematics 2
CH E 041 Introduction to Process Control
CH E 522 Advanced Process Dynamics and Control
CH E 524 Process Control Laboratory
CIV E 342 Transport Principles and Applications
CIV E 343 Traffic Engineering
CIV E 344 Urban Transport Planning
CIV E 375 Water Quality Engineering
CIV E 440 Transport Systems Analysis
CIV E 473 Contaminant Transport
CIV E 480 Water Resources Management
CIV E 486 Hydrology
M E 340 Manufacturing Processes
M SCI 432 Introduction to Production Management
M SCI 452 Decision Making Under Uncertainty
SY DE 372 Pattern Recognition
SY DE 434 Random Process in the Environment
SY DE 533 Conflict Analysis

For further information contact the Option Co-ordinators,
Keith W. Hipel - Department of Systems Design Engineering
Clif Young - Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science

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Option in Water Resources

This Option is for students interested in the development, management and protection of water resources. Students are prepared for careers with consulting firms or regulatory agencies. They acquire the background to design and evaluate hydraulic structures, pollution control schemes and water management systems. They are also exposed to the social and environmental aspects of use of water resources. A minimum of seven courses is required. However most students in Civil Engineering will probably wish to take more.
There are four required courses:
CIV E 280 (or equivalent) Fluid Mechanics
CIV E 375 Water Quality Engineering
CIV E 381 Hydraulics
CIV E 486 Hydrology

A minimum of three elective courses is required to be taken from the following list, subject to timetable constraints.

Surface Water
CIV E 473 (W) Contaminant Transport
CIV E 483 (W) Design of Urban Water Systems

Treatment
CIV E 472 (F,S) Waste Water Treatment
CH E 032 (W,S) Introductory Biotechnology
CH E 574 (W) Treatment of Aqueous Inorganic Wastes

Groundwater
EARTH 458 (F,S) Physical Hydrogeology
EARTH 459 (W) Chemical Hydrogeology
EARTH 358 (W) Environmental Geology

Management
ENV E 320 (W,S) Environmental Resource Management
SY DE 533 (F) Conflict Analysis

Mathematics
CIV E 422 (W) Finite Element Analysis
SY DE 554 (W) Modelling of Continuum Systems
M E 559 (F,S) Finite Element Methods
EARTH 456 (F) Numerical Methods in Geoscience
M E 304 (W,S) Numerical Analysis
SY DE 312 (S) Numerical Analysis and Computer Methods
SY DE 511 (F) Probabilistic Modelling
SY DE 311 (S) Engineering Optimization

Remote Sensing
GEOG 275 (F) Introductory Air Photo Analysis and Remote Sensing
GEOG 376 (W) Environmental Remote Sensing
GEOG 471 (F,W) Advanced Remote Sensing

Air Pollution
CH E 572 (W) Air Pollution Control
M E 571 (W) Air Pollution

Fluids
M E 362 (F,W) Fluid Mechanics 2
M E 566 (F,S) Fluid Mechanics 3

Other courses may be substituted with permission of the Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies and the Option Co-ordinator. Course offerings are subject to change; check with the appropriate department to ensure course availability.

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Option in Management Sciences

This designated Option consists of a mixture of courses, some of which are technical in nature, and some of which qualify as complementary studies courses. The Option is available to all Engineering students. It is intended for students interested in the issues, concepts and techniques related to managerial problems, particularly in technologically-based organizations. The Option consists of seven courses including four required courses or their equivalents:
M SCI 251 Probability and Statistics
M SCI 261 Managerial and Engineering Economics 1
M SCI 331 Operations Research 1
M SCI 211* Organizational Behaviour

plus at least two of the following or equivalent:
M SCI 311* Organizational Design and Technology
M SCI 431 Operations Research 2
M SCI 432 Introduction to Production Management
M SCI 441 Management of Information Systems
M SCI 452 Decision Making Under Uncertainty
M SCI 461* Managerial and Engineering Economics 2

and at most one of the following courses:
ACC 371* Managerial Finance 1
CS 330 Management Information Systems (may not be taken with M SCI 441)
ECON 201* Microeconomic Theory
GEN E 452* Technical Entrepreneurship
STAT 335 Statistical Process Control

* These courses count toward Complementary Studies requirements.

There are many possible course combinations that could be selected depending on which aspects of the Management Sciences the student wishes to focus. Students who wish to develop business skills should consider including either ACC 371 or GEN E 452 in their program.

For further information see the Management Sciences section in this chapter of the calendar or contact the Associate Chair of the Management Sciences Department, who is the Option Co-ordinator.

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Option in Society, Technology and Values

The Society Technology & Values Option promotes an awareness of the relationship between technology and society. The STV Option gives students a high degree of freedom in relating fundamental STV questions, ideas and issues to their own areas of interest. Students may register for individual courses as well as for the Option.

The STV Option consists of six courses in three categories:
Category 1: Students must start with either STV 100 Society, Technology and Values: Introduction
or
STV 202 Design and Society (no prerequisite)
Both courses are available in the evening.

Category 2: Intervening courses
Four courses are chosen by the student in consultation with the Centre for Society, Technology and Values to form a "Theme Package". These courses may be drawn from any UW offerings including other STV courses.

Category 3: The final course, namely
STV 400 Society, Technology and Values: Senior Project is open only to students in the STV Option.

Examples of themes for the Theme Package component of the Option are:
Technology and the Environment
Technology, Values and Manufacturing
Women and Technology
Design, Values and Technology
Technology and Communication
Technology and Artistic Expression
Computers and Society
Technology and History
Biotechnology
Technology and Health
Technology and the Workplace
Society, Technology and Change
Technology and The Third World
Ethics and Technology
Technology and Disability

For more information and advice in choosing possible courses, contact the Centre for Society, Technology and Values (DC 2608, UW ext. 6215) or the Option Co-ordinator, Professor S.C. Lerner, Environment and Resource Studies.

Students who take this Option may meet part of the Complementary Studies requirements of their program subject to the approval of the student's Departmental Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies.

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Option in International Studies in Engineering

The Option in International Studies in Engineering provides an enriched educational program by focusing on the global nature of engineering. It provides a background in the engineering aspects of international trade and a wider appreciation of cultural diversity. It includes work abroad, or study abroad, or both to achieve a result that is not possible in the classroom alone. The Faculty Option will probably require extra academic material on campus, in addition to an overseas experience of work or study or both. It will result in a life-long benefit for those students who are inclined and able to seek enrichment in their education.

The Option consists of academic requirements on the UW campus, together with study terms or work terms, or both, at overseas locations, for at least eight months. To be accepted for the Option designation of International Studies in Engineering, the complete program must be approved by the Co-ordinator of the Option.

Program

  1. Designation of the Option requires the approval of the Option Co-ordinator, and normally will be limited to students who maintain at least a 70% average. The requirements of the Option are GEN E 303 (see (3) below), and six other courses as specified in (2), (4) and (5) below.
  2. Three UW courses will normally be required before leaving for abroad, which normally will not occur before the 3A term is complete. These subjects will be specified according to the country of destination, and will include literature, history, and regional studies, as well as language preparation.
  3. The second part of the program is an overseas experience of at least two terms, including study terms or work terms, or both. An acceptable written report is required, and would earn the equivalent of a course credit towards the requirements of the Option under GEN E 303. The student would register in GEN E 303 in the first academic term upon return, although this does not count towards the normal academic load, nor does it earn credit towards a degree.
  4. The final part of the program is at least three UW courses, or the equivalent, from an approved list that complete the requirements of the International Studies Option. These must be approved by the Option Co-ordinator, and would be directed towards integrating the overseas experience into the broader perspective through courses in international economics, history or politics.
  5. There is considerable flexibility permitted in the scheduling of the six courses beyond that outlined in (2) and (4) above. In particular, suitable subjects taken when abroad may be approved by the Option Co-ordinator for credit towards the course requirement.

For further information regarding this Option, contact the Faculty of Engineering, Exchange Program Office, CPH 1320E.

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Option in Environmental Engineering

This Option is for students who wish to pursue their education with an emphasis on environmental concerns, assessment of the environmental impact of new or existing products or processes, methods for solving problems resulting from pollution in the air, in the water, or in the earth, and on the management of resources in order to minimize pollution in the environment. This is a Faculty option and includes course material related to all the disciplines but applied specifically to environmental concerns.

The Option consists of a set of five required courses and a two-term project course. The project course will normally be taken in the 4A and 4B academic terms. The courses are:
ERS 241* Introduction to Environmental and Social Impact Assessment
BIOL 250+ Ecology
ENV E 220 Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology
ENV E 320 Environmental Resource Management
ENV E 420 Modelling of the Environment
ENV E 430 Environmental Engineering Project 1
ENV E 431 Environmental Engineering Project 2

* ERS 241 satisfies the Impact of Technology on Society requirement as part of the Complementary Studies complement of courses required of Engineering students. + ENV S 200 is an acceptable equivalent for BIOL 250.

Substitution of other courses, if applicable, require the approval of the Option Co-ordinator, the Associate Dean of Engineering for Undergraduate Studies. In the case of the project course, use of this course for departmental program requirements will also require the approval of the Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies of the student's department.

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